asterisk-addons setting up mysql cdr for Asterisk

chris (2007-04-30 09:46:19)
27897 views
5 replies
To get Asterisk to log CDR to a mysql database, you will need to fiddle about with asterisk-addons and get the module compiled and loaded into your asterisk server. Before compiling asterisk addons, however, you might want to add the following line to the Makefile:

CFLAGS+=-DMYSQL_LOGUNIQUEID

and then add this line to the dr_addon_mysql.c :

#define MYSQL_LOGUNIQUEID

These two small changes will enable your system to include the uniqueid in the cdr records.

Now to set up your mysql environment, start off by downloading these two archives from mysql.com mirrors;

mysql-5.0.37-linux-i686.tar.gz
mysql-5.0.37.tar.gz

The first mysql download will provide the binary installation for our cdr database, and the other to provide matching sources and headers to compile libraries against. These are required for building the app_addon_sql_mysql.so module in asterisk-addons. This is the module that we will load into asterisk to provide the mysql cdr functionality.

moved mysql-5.0.37-linux-i686-icc-glibc23.tar.gz to /usr/local, extracted it and create mysql sylmlink:
  626  mv mysql-5.0.37-linux-i686.tar.gz  /usr/local/
  627  cd /usr/local/
  628  tar -zxvf mysql-5.0.37-linux-i686.tar.gz
  524  ln -s mysql-5.0.37-linux-i686 mysql
  525  cd mysql
  526  ls
  527  scripts/mysql_install_db  --user=mysql
  528  chown -R root
  529  chown -R root .
  530  chwon -R mysql data
  531  chown -R mysql data
  532  chgrp  -R mysql .
  533  bin/mysqld_safe --user=mysql &

Now just to check that the mysql server is running:
root@ser-6:/usr/local/mysql# mysql
Welcome to the MySQL monitor.  Commands end with ; or g.
Your MySQL connection id is 6
Server version: 5.0.37 MySQL Community Server (GPL)

Type 'help;' or 'h' for help. Type 'c' to clear the buffer.

mysql> quit
Bye

root@ser-6:/usr/local/mysql#

looks good. The next stage is to compile the mysql client libraries - this will create the libmysqlclient.so which is needed to build the asterisk mysql cdr addon.
  537  cd /usr/src/
  539  tar -zxvf mysql-5.0.37.tar.gz
  540  cd mysql-5.0.37
  543  ./configure --without-server
  544  make && make install

Now you can recompile asterisk-addons, but note, if you try to load the module into asterisk straight away, you may get the following error:

Error loading module 'app_addon_sql_mysql.so': libmysqlclient.so.15

To overcome this, make sure that you update your /etc/ld.so.conf and then run ldconfig. You will need to include the path to your libmysqlclient directory by adding /usr/local/lib/mysql into the /etc/ld.so.conf. If you have installed your mysql client libs elsewhere, then just check that your linker can find them!

If you're still having problems, this may be because you actually have to recompile asterisk aswell. I'm a bit unclear on this, but as far as I can make out, this is purely an architectural issue - Asterisk is based on a monolithic architecture and doesn't provide the full modular functionality that you often get with server apps such as Apache, or even the linux kernel itself, so sometimes a full recompile is required to build in what should be just modular extensions. Perhaps somebody can clarify this.

Once you're done compiling, there are three ways to check whether or not your nodule works. These are:

1) Edit your /etc/asterisk/modules.conf and ensure that the cdr_addon_mysql.so is in the load list. You sholud see a line like:

load => cdr_addon_mysql.so

You can then load asterisk in sonsole mode and watch the output to see if any errors are generateed when the module is loaded. Do this by running:

% asterisk -c

2) Another way to achieve all this is to start asterisk, and then to fire up the asterisk cli and query the list of loaded modules. Do it like this:
% asterisk start
% asterisk -rvvvvvvv
Asterisk 1.4.4, Copyright (C) 1999 - 2006 Digium, Inc. and others.
Created by Mark Spencer <markster@digium.com>
Asterisk comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY; type 'core show warranty' for details.
This is free software, with components licensed under the GNU General Public
License version 2 and other licenses; you are welcome to redistribute it under
certain conditions. Type 'core show license' for details.
=========================================================================
  == Parsing '/etc/asterisk/asterisk.conf': Found
  == Parsing '/etc/asterisk/extconfig.conf': Found
Connected to Asterisk 1.4.4 currently running on ser-6 (pid = 27969)
Verbosity was 0 and is now 6	
ser-6*CLI> module show
The Asterisk CLI will then list all the loaded modules. You should see these two modules in the list:
app_addon_sql_mysql.so         Simple Mysql Interface                   0
res_config_mysql.so            MySQL RealTime Configuration Driver      0
At this stage, however, asterisk will still complain that it can't connect to the cdr database. This is because we haven't created one!

Next we have to prepare the database for asterisk to write it's CDR data to. This will be a plain old mysql database with a table called cdr. You can call the database whatever you want. In this case I will call the database 'pipes' (because I'm setting it up for Confonia's pipes product) and the table 'cdr'. The cdr table is where asterisk will record it's 'call data records'.

The simplest way to do this is to create a text file containing all the SQL required to create your CDR database. I created one which includes a 'uniqueid' column which I will use to store the uniqueid of every call logged. The file should look like this:
CREATE DATABASE pipes;

GRANT INSERT
  ON pipes.*
  TO pipes@localhost
  IDENTIFIED BY 'putpasswordhere';

USE asterisk;

CREATE TABLE `cdr` (
`calldate` datetime NOT NULL default '0000-00-00 00:00:00',
`clid` varchar(80) NOT NULL default '',
`src` varchar(80) NOT NULL default '',
`dst` varchar(80) NOT NULL default '',
`dcontext` varchar(80) NOT NULL default '',
`channel` varchar(80) NOT NULL default '',
`dstchannel` varchar(80) NOT NULL default '',
`lastapp` varchar(80) NOT NULL default '',
`lastdata` varchar(80) NOT NULL default '',
`duration` int(11) NOT NULL default '0',
`billsec` int(11) NOT NULL default '0',
`disposition` varchar(45) NOT NULL default '',
`amaflags` int(11) NOT NULL default '0',
`accountcode` varchar(20) NOT NULL default '',
`uniqueid` varchar(32) NOT NULL default '',
`userfield` varchar(255) NOT NULL default ''
);

ALTER TABLE `cdr` ADD INDEX ( `calldate` );
ALTER TABLE `cdr` ADD INDEX ( `dst` );
ALTER TABLE `cdr` ADD INDEX ( `accountcode` );

Note that because I have only just installed the database and I haven't set up the grants and passwords yet, I can simply run mysql as root and redirect this file into the process. Note, it is bad practice to leave your mysql in it's default post-installed state, so in a second we will run through the post-installation steps required to lock down your mysql server and ensure that nobody can tamper with your data.

So to create your database with the cdr table within it, just save the above file, say as build.sql and run this command:
% mysql <build.sql
We're still not quite there. We need to tell Asterisk where to find the database and the authentication details it will need to connect. This is done in the /etc/asterisk/cdr_mysql.conf. This file should look like this:
[global]
hostname=localhost
dbname=pipes
password=putpasswordhere
user=pipes
You will now be able to restart your asterisk server and make a test call. Your call record should look something like this:

mysql> select * from cdrG
*************************** 1. row ***************************
   calldate: 2007-04-30 09:29:00
       clid: 7918160320
        src: 7918160320
        dst: 810204
   dcontext: pipes
    channel: IAX2/pipes-1
 dstchannel:
    lastapp: AGI
   lastdata: pipes.pl
   duration: 8
    billsec: 8
disposition: ANSWERED
   amaflags: 3
accountcode:
   uniqueid: 1177921740.0
  userfield:
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

And we're done. I hope that's useful to somebody. Since I have gone through quite a lot of mucking about to actually get this all to play nicely!

christo
comment
stephenl
2008-03-23 22:21:25

AsteriskNow

To get Asterisk to log CDR to a mysql database, you will need to fiddle about with asterisk-addons and get the module compiled and loaded into your asterisk server. Before compiling asterisk addons, however, you might want to add the following line to the Makefile:

CFLAGS+=-DMYSQL_LOGUNIQUEID

and then add this line to the dr_addon_mysql.c :

#define MYSQL_LOGUNIQUEID

These two small changes will enable your system to include the uniqueid in the cdr records.

Now to set up your mysql environment, start off by downloading these two archives from mysql.com mirrors;

mysql-5.0.37-linux-i686.tar.gz
mysql-5.0.37.tar.gz

The first mysql download will provide the binary installation for our cdr database, and the other to provide matching sources and headers to compile libraries against. These are required for building the app_addon_sql_mysql.so module in asterisk-addons. This is the module that we will load into asterisk to provide the mysql cdr functionality.

moved mysql-5.0.37-linux-i686-icc-glibc23.tar.gz to /usr/local, extracted it and create mysql sylmlink:
  626  mv mysql-5.0.37-linux-i686.tar.gz  /usr/local/
  627  cd /usr/local/
  628  tar -zxvf mysql-5.0.37-linux-i686.tar.gz
  524  ln -s mysql-5.0.37-linux-i686 mysql
  525  cd mysql
  526  ls
  527  scripts/mysql_install_db  --user=mysql
  528  chown -R root
  529  chown -R root .
  530  chwon -R mysql data
  531  chown -R mysql data
  532  chgrp  -R mysql .
  533  bin/mysqld_safe --user=mysql &

Now just to check that the mysql server is running:
root@ser-6:/usr/local/mysql# mysql
Welcome to the MySQL monitor.  Commands end with ; or g.
Your MySQL connection id is 6
Server version: 5.0.37 MySQL Community Server (GPL)

Type 'help;' or 'h' for help. Type 'c' to clear the buffer.

mysql> quit
Bye

root@ser-6:/usr/local/mysql#

looks good. The next stage is to compile the mysql client libraries - this will create the libmysqlclient.so which is needed to build the asterisk mysql cdr addon.
  537  cd /usr/src/
  539  tar -zxvf mysql-5.0.37.tar.gz
  540  cd mysql-5.0.37
  543  ./configure --without-server
  544  make && make install

Now you can recompile asterisk-addons, but note, if you try to load the module into asterisk straight away, you may get the following error:

Error loading module 'app_addon_sql_mysql.so': libmysqlclient.so.15

To overcome this, make sure that you update your /etc/ld.so.conf and then run ldconfig. You will need to include the path to your libmysqlclient directory by adding /usr/local/lib/mysql into the /etc/ld.so.conf. If you have installed your mysql client libs elsewhere, then just check that your linker can find them!

If you're still having problems, this may be because you actually have to recompile asterisk aswell. I'm a bit unclear on this, but as far as I can make out, this is purely an architectural issue - Asterisk is based on a monolithic architecture and doesn't provide the full modular functionality that you often get with server apps such as Apache, or even the linux kernel itself, so sometimes a full recompile is required to build in what should be just modular extensions. Perhaps somebody can clarify this.

Once you're done compiling, there are three ways to check whether or not your nodule works. These are:

1) Edit your /etc/asterisk/modules.conf and ensure that the cdr_addon_mysql.so is in the load list. You sholud see a line like:

load => cdr_addon_mysql.so

You can then load asterisk in sonsole mode and watch the output to see if any errors are generateed when the module is loaded. Do this by running:

% asterisk -c

2) Another way to achieve all this is to start asterisk, and then to fire up the asterisk cli and query the list of loaded modules. Do it like this:
% asterisk start
% asterisk -rvvvvvvv
Asterisk 1.4.4, Copyright (C) 1999 - 2006 Digium, Inc. and others.
Created by Mark Spencer <markster@digium.com>
Asterisk comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY; type 'core show warranty' for details.
This is free software, with components licensed under the GNU General Public
License version 2 and other licenses; you are welcome to redistribute it under
certain conditions. Type 'core show license' for details.
=========================================================================
  == Parsing '/etc/asterisk/asterisk.conf': Found
  == Parsing '/etc/asterisk/extconfig.conf': Found
Connected to Asterisk 1.4.4 currently running on ser-6 (pid = 27969)
Verbosity was 0 and is now 6	
ser-6*CLI> module show
The Asterisk CLI will then list all the loaded modules. You should see these two modules in the list:
app_addon_sql_mysql.so         Simple Mysql Interface                   0
res_config_mysql.so            MySQL RealTime Configuration Driver      0
At this stage, however, asterisk will still complain that it can't connect to the cdr database. This is because we haven't created one!

Next we have to prepare the database for asterisk to write it's CDR data to. This will be a plain old mysql database with a table called cdr. You can call the database whatever you want. In this case I will call the database 'pipes' (because I'm setting it up for Confonia's pipes product) and the table 'cdr'. The cdr table is where asterisk will record it's 'call data records'.

The simplest way to do this is to create a text file containing all the SQL required to create your CDR database. I created one which includes a 'uniqueid' column which I will use to store the uniqueid of every call logged. The file should look like this:
CREATE DATABASE pipes;

GRANT INSERT
  ON pipes.*
  TO pipes@localhost
  IDENTIFIED BY 'putpasswordhere';

USE asterisk;

CREATE TABLE `cdr` (
`calldate` datetime NOT NULL default '0000-00-00 00:00:00',
`clid` varchar(80) NOT NULL default '',
`src` varchar(80) NOT NULL default '',
`dst` varchar(80) NOT NULL default '',
`dcontext` varchar(80) NOT NULL default '',
`channel` varchar(80) NOT NULL default '',
`dstchannel` varchar(80) NOT NULL default '',
`lastapp` varchar(80) NOT NULL default '',
`lastdata` varchar(80) NOT NULL default '',
`duration` int(11) NOT NULL default '0',
`billsec` int(11) NOT NULL default '0',
`disposition` varchar(45) NOT NULL default '',
`amaflags` int(11) NOT NULL default '0',
`accountcode` varchar(20) NOT NULL default '',
`uniqueid` varchar(32) NOT NULL default '',
`userfield` varchar(255) NOT NULL default ''
);

ALTER TABLE `cdr` ADD INDEX ( `calldate` );
ALTER TABLE `cdr` ADD INDEX ( `dst` );
ALTER TABLE `cdr` ADD INDEX ( `accountcode` );

Note that because I have only just installed the database and I haven't set up the grants and passwords yet, I can simply run mysql as root and redirect this file into the process. Note, it is bad practice to leave your mysql in it's default post-installed state, so in a second we will run through the post-installation steps required to lock down your mysql server and ensure that nobody can tamper with your data.

So to create your database with the cdr table within it, just save the above file, say as build.sql and run this command:
% mysql <build.sql
We're still not quite there. We need to tell Asterisk where to find the database and the authentication details it will need to connect. This is done in the /etc/asterisk/cdr_mysql.conf. This file should look like this:
[global]
hostname=localhost
dbname=pipes
password=putpasswordhere
user=pipes
You will now be able to restart your asterisk server and make a test call. Your call record should look something like this:

mysql> select * from cdrG
*************************** 1. row ***************************
   calldate: 2007-04-30 09:29:00
       clid: 7918160320
        src: 7918160320
        dst: 810204
   dcontext: pipes
    channel: IAX2/pipes-1
 dstchannel:
    lastapp: AGI
   lastdata: pipes.pl
   duration: 8
    billsec: 8
disposition: ANSWERED
   amaflags: 3
accountcode:
   uniqueid: 1177921740.0
  userfield:
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

And we're done. I hope that's useful to somebody. Since I have gone through quite a lot of mucking about to actually get this all to play nicely!

christo

Hi
I am about to install CDR on my AsteriskNow Instalation and came across this comprehensive instruction..
Are you able to confirm if this is also suitable for AsetriskNow Installs ??
Also, you mention modifing the Makefile, can you please confirm wher this file is located
Thank you
Stephen
reply icon
Dan Clark
2008-09-04 09:11:38

worked !!

Very good walkthrough, worked great on my asterisknow system

feel free to contact for help - dan at unifone dot net dot nz

Cheers
Dan

To get Asterisk to log CDR to a mysql database, you will need to fiddle about with asterisk-addons and get the module compiled and loaded into your asterisk server. Before compiling asterisk addons, however, you might want to add the following line to the Makefile:

CFLAGS+=-DMYSQL_LOGUNIQUEID

and then add this line to the dr_addon_mysql.c :

#define MYSQL_LOGUNIQUEID

These two small changes will enable your system to include the uniqueid in the cdr records.

Now to set up your mysql environment, start off by downloading these two archives from mysql.com mirrors;

mysql-5.0.37-linux-i686.tar.gz
mysql-5.0.37.tar.gz

The first mysql download will provide the binary installation for our cdr database, and the other to provide matching sources and headers to compile libraries against. These are required for building the app_addon_sql_mysql.so module in asterisk-addons. This is the module that we will load into asterisk to provide the mysql cdr functionality.

moved mysql-5.0.37-linux-i686-icc-glibc23.tar.gz to /usr/local, extracted it and create mysql sylmlink:
  626  mv mysql-5.0.37-linux-i686.tar.gz  /usr/local/
  627  cd /usr/local/
  628  tar -zxvf mysql-5.0.37-linux-i686.tar.gz
  524  ln -s mysql-5.0.37-linux-i686 mysql
  525  cd mysql
  526  ls
  527  scripts/mysql_install_db  --user=mysql
  528  chown -R root
  529  chown -R root .
  530  chwon -R mysql data
  531  chown -R mysql data
  532  chgrp  -R mysql .
  533  bin/mysqld_safe --user=mysql &

Now just to check that the mysql server is running:
root@ser-6:/usr/local/mysql# mysql
Welcome to the MySQL monitor.  Commands end with ; or g.
Your MySQL connection id is 6
Server version: 5.0.37 MySQL Community Server (GPL)

Type 'help;' or 'h' for help. Type 'c' to clear the buffer.

mysql> quit
Bye

root@ser-6:/usr/local/mysql#

looks good. The next stage is to compile the mysql client libraries - this will create the libmysqlclient.so which is needed to build the asterisk mysql cdr addon.
  537  cd /usr/src/
  539  tar -zxvf mysql-5.0.37.tar.gz
  540  cd mysql-5.0.37
  543  ./configure --without-server
  544  make && make install

Now you can recompile asterisk-addons, but note, if you try to load the module into asterisk straight away, you may get the following error:

Error loading module 'app_addon_sql_mysql.so': libmysqlclient.so.15

To overcome this, make sure that you update your /etc/ld.so.conf and then run ldconfig. You will need to include the path to your libmysqlclient directory by adding /usr/local/lib/mysql into the /etc/ld.so.conf. If you have installed your mysql client libs elsewhere, then just check that your linker can find them!

If you're still having problems, this may be because you actually have to recompile asterisk aswell. I'm a bit unclear on this, but as far as I can make out, this is purely an architectural issue - Asterisk is based on a monolithic architecture and doesn't provide the full modular functionality that you often get with server apps such as Apache, or even the linux kernel itself, so sometimes a full recompile is required to build in what should be just modular extensions. Perhaps somebody can clarify this.

Once you're done compiling, there are three ways to check whether or not your nodule works. These are:

1) Edit your /etc/asterisk/modules.conf and ensure that the cdr_addon_mysql.so is in the load list. You sholud see a line like:

load => cdr_addon_mysql.so

You can then load asterisk in sonsole mode and watch the output to see if any errors are generateed when the module is loaded. Do this by running:

% asterisk -c

2) Another way to achieve all this is to start asterisk, and then to fire up the asterisk cli and query the list of loaded modules. Do it like this:
% asterisk start
% asterisk -rvvvvvvv
Asterisk 1.4.4, Copyright (C) 1999 - 2006 Digium, Inc. and others.
Created by Mark Spencer <markster@digium.com>
Asterisk comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY; type 'core show warranty' for details.
This is free software, with components licensed under the GNU General Public
License version 2 and other licenses; you are welcome to redistribute it under
certain conditions. Type 'core show license' for details.
=========================================================================
  == Parsing '/etc/asterisk/asterisk.conf': Found
  == Parsing '/etc/asterisk/extconfig.conf': Found
Connected to Asterisk 1.4.4 currently running on ser-6 (pid = 27969)
Verbosity was 0 and is now 6	
ser-6*CLI> module show
The Asterisk CLI will then list all the loaded modules. You should see these two modules in the list:
app_addon_sql_mysql.so         Simple Mysql Interface                   0
res_config_mysql.so            MySQL RealTime Configuration Driver      0
At this stage, however, asterisk will still complain that it can't connect to the cdr database. This is because we haven't created one!

Next we have to prepare the database for asterisk to write it's CDR data to. This will be a plain old mysql database with a table called cdr. You can call the database whatever you want. In this case I will call the database 'pipes' (because I'm setting it up for Confonia's pipes product) and the table 'cdr'. The cdr table is where asterisk will record it's 'call data records'.

The simplest way to do this is to create a text file containing all the SQL required to create your CDR database. I created one which includes a 'uniqueid' column which I will use to store the uniqueid of every call logged. The file should look like this:
CREATE DATABASE pipes;

GRANT INSERT
  ON pipes.*
  TO pipes@localhost
  IDENTIFIED BY 'putpasswordhere';

USE asterisk;

CREATE TABLE `cdr` (
`calldate` datetime NOT NULL default '0000-00-00 00:00:00',
`clid` varchar(80) NOT NULL default '',
`src` varchar(80) NOT NULL default '',
`dst` varchar(80) NOT NULL default '',
`dcontext` varchar(80) NOT NULL default '',
`channel` varchar(80) NOT NULL default '',
`dstchannel` varchar(80) NOT NULL default '',
`lastapp` varchar(80) NOT NULL default '',
`lastdata` varchar(80) NOT NULL default '',
`duration` int(11) NOT NULL default '0',
`billsec` int(11) NOT NULL default '0',
`disposition` varchar(45) NOT NULL default '',
`amaflags` int(11) NOT NULL default '0',
`accountcode` varchar(20) NOT NULL default '',
`uniqueid` varchar(32) NOT NULL default '',
`userfield` varchar(255) NOT NULL default ''
);

ALTER TABLE `cdr` ADD INDEX ( `calldate` );
ALTER TABLE `cdr` ADD INDEX ( `dst` );
ALTER TABLE `cdr` ADD INDEX ( `accountcode` );

Note that because I have only just installed the database and I haven't set up the grants and passwords yet, I can simply run mysql as root and redirect this file into the process. Note, it is bad practice to leave your mysql in it's default post-installed state, so in a second we will run through the post-installation steps required to lock down your mysql server and ensure that nobody can tamper with your data.

So to create your database with the cdr table within it, just save the above file, say as build.sql and run this command:
% mysql <build.sql
We're still not quite there. We need to tell Asterisk where to find the database and the authentication details it will need to connect. This is done in the /etc/asterisk/cdr_mysql.conf. This file should look like this:
[global]
hostname=localhost
dbname=pipes
password=putpasswordhere
user=pipes
You will now be able to restart your asterisk server and make a test call. Your call record should look something like this:

mysql> select * from cdrG
*************************** 1. row ***************************
   calldate: 2007-04-30 09:29:00
       clid: 7918160320
        src: 7918160320
        dst: 810204
   dcontext: pipes
    channel: IAX2/pipes-1
 dstchannel:
    lastapp: AGI
   lastdata: pipes.pl
   duration: 8
    billsec: 8
disposition: ANSWERED
   amaflags: 3
accountcode:
   uniqueid: 1177921740.0
  userfield:
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

And we're done. I hope that's useful to somebody. Since I have gone through quite a lot of mucking about to actually get this all to play nicely!

christo
reply iconedit reply
Hellokuti
2009-03-19 14:34:26

Hello everyone,
I'm a newbie. I've tried this way but nothing's displayed in mysql database.
I use redhat 5, asterisk 1.6.0.5, asterisk add-ons 1.6.0, mysql 5.1.0.32.

The error I can see after asterisk -vccccc command is:
[Mar 19 14:17:04] ERROR[4079]: cdr_addon_mysql.c:508 my_load_module: Unable to query table description!! Logging disabled.
cdr_addon_mysql.so => (MySQL CDR Backend)

Please help me, thank you!


reply iconedit reply
pepesz
2009-07-21 21:03:06

I'm using Asterisk 1.6.2.0-beta3 with asterisk-addons-1.6.2.0-rc1 to write cdr into mysql.
I followed the above tutorial and it is mostly working however CLID is not written to mysql,
although it appears in Master.csv.
What do I possibly missing?
TIA
reply icon
Enrico
2010-03-05 19:40:15

Check Privilege Select

Hi, I have solve this iusse setting the select previlege for asterisk user in my sql because i have looked the source file and the cdr app attempt to do a desc query for table wich need select privilege

sorry for my bad english


Hello everyone,
I'm a newbie. I've tried this way but nothing's displayed in mysql database.
I use redhat 5, asterisk 1.6.0.5, asterisk add-ons 1.6.0, mysql 5.1.0.32.

The error I can see after asterisk -vccccc command is:
[Mar 19 14:17:04] ERROR[4079]: cdr_addon_mysql.c:508 my_load_module: Unable to query table description!! Logging disabled.
cdr_addon_mysql.so => (MySQL CDR Backend)

Please help me, thank you!


reply iconedit reply